News

38th WAGC in Guiyang, China
By Viktor Lin | International | 12.06.2017 12:58 | Views: 1805 | Comments: 3
The 38th World Amateur Go Championship, held at Sheraton Hotel in Guiyang, China from 2 to 9 June, concluded with the flawless victory of the Chinese representative Bai Baoxiang 8d.

This year, although China won the WAGC, subtitled China Asset Management Cup, with a 8:0 result, without a single loss, the competition for the runner-up places was extremely close. No one scored 7 victories, so the SOS tiebreaker played a big role in the distribution of the remaining places.

The 38th WAGC adopted a purely Swiss tournament system. With the exception of four seeded players, i.e. the fours best countries at last WAGC (China, Korea, C. Taipei, Ukraine), who were spread apart lest they meet too early in the tournament, the pairings were perfectly randomised. Every player except the above mentioned four drew a number corresponding to the number in the table, and were subsequently paired according to the number.
Cornel Burzo 6d (Romania), best European.

This implies that luck was also involved throughout the tournament. While the first round had a difficult showdown already between Korea and Japan, others (like me) could advance without problems, at least for a few rounds.
Among the European participants, Lukas Podpera from Czech Republic left the greatest impression by defeating C. Taipei in the second round (and therefore achieving his personal goal early on in the tournament). However, Lukas ran out of steam after being defeated by North Korea by 0,5 in the fourth round and eventually ended up in 10th place with a score of 5:3.
Half-point game between Lukas Podpera 6d (Czech Republic) and Jin Ung Ri (North Korea).

Later on, in round 6, Dmitry Surin was the only European left with only one defeat and the most promising to get a good placement, but ended up on the 9th place after losing the two remaining games, to the eventual champion Bai Baoxing and Cornel Burzo from Romania respectively. The latter was the only European who scored 6:2 and ended up on the 6th place.

Place  Name  Country Wins SOS
 1  Bai Baoxiang  China  8  84
 2  Lee Sangbin  South Korea  6  86
 3  Lai Yu Cheng  C. Taipei  6  80
 4  Daniel Ko  USA  6  80
 5  Shusaku Sakamoto   Japan  6  80
 6  Jin Ung Ri  North Korea  6  78
 7  Cornel Burzo  Romania  6  74
 8  Chan Nai San  Hong Kong  6  68
 9  Dmitry Surin  Russia  5  84
 10  Lukas Podpera  Czech Republic  5  82

(The tie breaker used to decide the order for the 3rd to 5th places is SOS without taking into account the first round/first and second rounds etc.)

Besides the tournament, several topics were addressed during the WAGC:

-) The decisions of the IGF board regarding the next WAGCs were accepted unanimously by the Annual Meeting of the representatives. Since the Olympic Games 2020 will be held in Tokyo, Japan claims the next two WAGCs under their next two-year IGF presidency, in order to attract publicity for go before the Olympic Games. Thus, WAGC 2018 will be held (from 2 to 9 May) at Nihon Ki-in in Tokyo, and WAGC 2019 in Shimane.
The Russian proposal for a WAGC in Vladivostok will be realised in 2020, with full support from and under the IGF presidency of Korea.
A giant rock-paper-scissors impression.

-) The IGF has been working on international ruling and scoring systems, as well as arranging better go education and publicity in the form of a pamphlet.

-) Yike Go Server, apparently the most popular Chinese go app at the moment, announced plans for creating a desktop version and English versions. You can find all broadcasted and recorded games from WAGC on Yike, each game having tens of thousands of views from the Chinese audience.

-) It was commented that humans shall stop competing with bots and regard them as friendly and useful tools that are narrowing the gap between the skills of the East and of the West. (AlphaGo had just swept away top Chinese pros in various playing settings, only losing to itself in an AlphaGo+human rengo match.) In fact, an AI-only world championship was announced to take place in August, at the first Chinese Go Congress (also modelled after the EGC). Confirmation and details to follow.

Of course, even in the all-human WAGC, hints of AlphaGo could be found in many games. Most prominently, the South Korean representative Lee Sangbin invaded at 3-3 at every opportunity. For example:
Lee Sangbin 7d (South Korea) vs. Jin Ung Ri (North Korea).

(Find full records on Yike.)

-) Special mentions at the closing ceremony for:

-the youngest participant, 12 year-old Davide Bernardis from Italy.
-the oldest participant, 72 year-old Zoran Mutabzija from Croatia.
-Frank Janssen from the Netherlands for his cameo in Hikaru no Go.
-the North Korean representative Jin Ung Ri for his outstanding performance in spite of unfavourable training environment. Jin lost in the last round to South Korea by a mere half point, missing second place by a narrow margin. Jin also had the closest game with the Chinese champion, losing by only 1,5.
Davide Bernardis 2k (Italy).

Other observations:
-Japan's representative Shusaku Sakamoto turned out to be not related to the Shusaku as their names are written in different characters.
-Ricardo Alberto Garcia de la Banda Garcia from Spain had the longest (yet surprisingly pronouncible) name, whereas Xi Yue from Singapore had the shortest.
38th WAGC in Guiyang, China

This article was written by Viktor Lin

Profession: Student, manager of EGF Academy
Born: Vienna, 1992
Country: Austria
EGF rank: 6d
Started playing go: 2004

Comments:
Martin
#1
13.06.2017 23:28
Hi Viktor,
Thanks for your report, it looks like the tournament was fun.
Too bad that also this year the pairing system used was not very accurate in using the strength of the players for the pairing with as result a number of games between high dan players and low kyu players, not very interesting for both players.
This also results in the lottery of SOS points to determine the places between 3 and 10.
I still hope that the IGF will use a system based on MacMahon like used at the WAGC in Bangkok in 2015. Maybe next year in Japan?

Martin
Ian
#2
15.06.2017 17:55
I think the choice by the hosts of Swiss, with SOS-2 as tiebreaker seems reasonable, let's wait until we have IGF ratings before asking for McMahon.
Ricardo Alberto
#3
16.06.2017 11:07
Yes, This was the other place I could won something in this tournament but... the first one was the incredible/special/amazing expirience.

Thanks a lot to the Organization.
Leave a Comment
* Name
* Email (will not be published)
*
Please, enter the name of go in korean!
*
* - Reqiured fields
Add me to the EGF Newsletter:
Email Address *
More info

Calendar

Date Event
30.09.2017
01.10.2017
The 17th International Istanbul Go Tournament
07.10.2017
08.10.2017
Tournoi de Bordeaux
21.10.2017
22.10.2017
25 Years EGCC Anniversary Go Tournament
20.10.2017
22.10.2017
40th Belgrade Open
21.10.2017
22.10.2017
Geneva Go Tournament
28.10.2017
29.10.2017
32nd Brussels Tournament
28.10.2017
29.10.2017
20th Mannheim Go Open Autumn
17.11.2017
19.11.2017
20. Go to Innovation
24.11.2017
26.11.2017
Gothenburg Open
13.01.2018
14.01.2018
22nd Orsay Go Tournament
13.01.2018
14.01.2018
“Mini Go Congress” Trier
18.01.2018
21.01.2018
Grand Prix Final Olomouc
20.01.2018
21.01.2018
26th Olomouc International Go Tournament
07.04.2018
08.04.2018
European Pair Go Championship
05.05.2018
06.05.2018
10th Strasbourg international tournament
28.07.2018
11.08.2018
62nd European Go Congress

See also the full EGF Calendar (including world calendar).